Preparing Your Elevator Speech #329

Hello, welcome to Debbie’s Daily Tips.

I’m answering a question that came up in an email today. The question was, how do I prepare an elevator speech? What is it and how do I write it?

An elevator speech, when you think about it, is really like this – let’s pretend you and I are riding an elevator and you have less than a minute until we hit the ground floor. On that elevator ride I ask you, “What do you do for a living or why should I hire you?” If you can’t sell me on it by the time we’ve hit the ground floor, you may have lost my business forever.

The reason it’s so important to grab someone’s attention in 30 to 60 seconds, whether it’s on a prospecting call, out doorknocking, at an open house or at an appointment, is because the attention span of the average person is very, very short before their mind begins to wander off to other things.

Let’s face it – your customers and prospects have a lot on their plate and a lot on their minds. If they don’t determine quickly that you’re worth listening to, they’ll rule you out and maybe even start grinding away on you for a lower price or throwing objections at you because they really haven’t seen the value of what you have to offer.

What are the basic components of an elevator speech? It should be short: 30 to 60 seconds. It should be clear, it should be a little bit sexy. It could even have third party stories or examples, and ideally, it should be specifically created for that customer type. So maybe it’s an elevator speech for an expired. Why should they meet with you or talk to you? Maybe it’s an elevator speech for a seller, for a buyer, and it needs a hook, something that makes them want to know more and engages that customer or prospect in the conversation.

Your goal is not to do a speech that bores me. It should really grab me and make me want to hear more. It can be shocking how long 30 to 60 seconds really is. And if you don’t believe me, time it. Start now, be quiet. Count the seconds – it’s quite a while, isn’t it? It’s certainly enough time for you to put some great thoughts together. So how do you begin? Jot down ideas, jot down thoughts. What are your USPs, why are you good? Why are you valuable? I read something the other day that I thought was an outstanding tip. It said, go to your testimonials. Go to your reviews because what your clients are saying about you could be absolutely your best elevator speech of all.

Bottom line, you’re valuable. You bring a lot to the table. So how do we say that in a way that engages and excites that customer or prospect? It’ll take a little practice. Just a little work, but it’ll all be worth it.

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